Friday, 7 March 2014

Ignorance

Joachim R. Sison
2012-58294
STS

Reaction Paper: Radio Play Adaptation of Isaac Asimov's Nightfall

On the most shallow starting note possible, I can say I admired how the voice actors managed to deliver their lines clearly, though I could have done with more emotion in their voices. In a completely different observation, I found the premise interesting, if only because I enjoy reading books about high fantasy, and a world that never knew darkness, stars or night due to six suns was a unique idea, to say the least.

The main concept that I found intriguing though was the idea that the fear of darkness and the realization that there were more stars in the universe aside from the six that gave the planet eternal day was what undid the minds of the characters in the story. There was preparation for the darkness of "night", and yet the unexpected knowledge that the entire universe was not simply limited to the six suns drove them into hysterics, causing the destruction and undoing of their society.

It struck me as different and unique in the sense that it wasn't the fanatical belief that once night arrived the downfall would be caused by the stars unleashing a torrent of fire, or the scientist's idea that darkness would invoke fear in the people, resulting in society's collapse. It was the idea that the universe was vast, and that they were not aware of this fact. It's as if the realization that the universe was so large was what ultimately broke them, and that their ignorance had been the cause of their breakdown. For all intents and purposes, they most certainly could have survived the night that fell upon them if they simply kept composure, but when faced with the vastness of the universe, they lost all composure, and it was hinted that their civilization was undoing itself once again. Ignorance of this piece of information was what heralded their undoing.

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